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June 04
Start off the summer strong with fun runs and events for kids

​Alaska offers many opportunities to get out and play with your kids—camping, hiking, exploring and fun outdoor events—and many communities offer an assortment of kid-friendly runs or events at low or no cost. Getting your kids involved in physical activity is one of the best ways to support positive healthy habits they can take into adulthood.

Mosquito Meander in Fairbanks, Alaska Run for Women in Anchorage

Fairbanks starts its summer with the 2018 Mosquito Meander on June 9, a 5K (3.1 mile) family fun run/walk. This year will be the 26th running of the event, which benefits the Resource Center for Parents & Children. On the same day, Anchorage will have the Alaska Run for Women with 5- and 1-mile events for females of all ages and abilities. The run benefits the fight against breast cancer, with 100% of the donated proceeds going toward mammograms, breast cancer research and education. 

Other events in Seward, Cooper Landing, Palmer and Ketchikan

Here’s a glimpse of what’s going on around the state for kids: 

Fairbanks has four Kids Cross Country (XC) Runs at 6 p.m. every other Friday evening from June 8 through July 20 at the West Valley High School soccer fields. 

Seward Real Estate’s Bear Bells Run 1-mile event for kids is June 8 and Cooper Landing’s Trail Run is June 9. 

Anchorage starts one of four “Splash ‘n Dash” races, a kids-only swim and run at the Service High School Pool on June 26. 

Palmer has a Kilted Mile Race on June 30. It’s a family event and part of the Scottish Highland Games.

Ketchikan hosts the Blueberry Fun Run and Walk on August 4. This includes a 1-mile kid’s run.   

All of the details of these races and more can be found in the Alaska Runner's Calendar.

Leaders who start these races believe in making exercise fun for kids. Tracey Martinson started the Kids XC Runs in Fairbanks about 15 years ago.  She says she started them because there weren't many opportunities for young kids ages 5–10 to run in a timed event that is geared toward their abilities (0.5 mile to 1.5 miles).  

“The goal is to help kids enjoy running, not be overwhelmed by it, as can happen if they enter a 5K race,” she said. “We also have the Equinox Kid’s Marathon, now in its 16th year.”  Find more information on the kid’s marathon here.  

Heather Helzer, a competitive triathlete and ultra-runner, started Alaska Splash n' Dash in Anchorage last year as a way to give kids who are interested in triathlons more competition in Alaska. She wanted kids to have an opportunity to compete or participate in kids-only races. The Alaska Splash n' Dash is a swim/run three-race series, in which kids receive points and awards at the end of the series. 

“The goal is to encourage more kids to get involved in the sport of triathlon without the barrier of needing a bike, keeping the entry to the sport low and the race price low as well,” said Helzer. Prices are $20 for one race and $50 for all three races, which includes a medal at every race, T-shirt, snacks and more. 

Last year, about 40 kids participated in each Splash n’ Dash, with a total of more than 70 kids for the race series. Helzer said she expects 75–100 kids at this year’s races. Life jackets are allowed, and parents can run the entire course with their child. They also encourage the entire family to volunteer if they're unable to race. 

“This is a kids-only fun race with the goal for every kid to finish and have fun,” Helzer said. For more information, visit Turnagain Arm Training.

For more kid-friendly events, visit the Healthy Futures website​.  

May 21
Eagle River Triathlon kicks off a series of summer physical activity events

Kid's Mile photo with permission of Healthy Futures - resized for Web.jpgThe Eagle River Triathlon is Sunday, June 3, 2018, and it’s a great opportunity to start the summer spending time outdoors with your kids. The triathlon also kicks off a series of summer physical activity events, including the Mayor’s Marathon Kid’s Mile on June 21 and the Anchorage RunFest Kids 2K on August 18.

The Eagle River Tri is a sprint distance triathlon. It has an untimed event for kids ages 6 to 12, as well as timed events for adults and children 13 and older. The intent of the event is to promote a safe and fun introduction to the triathlon, as well as a competitive race for more experienced elite athletes.

Local athlete Liane Nagata has participated in the Eagle River Tri with her daughters, Lauren (20) and Madalyn (15) when they were younger.  She said it was the perfect introduction to triathlons for her daughters, as they later completed the Gold Nugget Triathlon in Anchorage.  

“The event is fun to watch, and once they did it one time, they were ready to do it again,” Nagata said. “They enjoyed it and the organization (of the event) makes it fun and definitely safe for even the littlest kids.”

The entry fees are $30.00 for kids and $108.00 for adults. The online registration deadline is June 1, 2018, or until the event sells out. There is no race-day registration, except for the kids’ race. The kids’ race, however, has a limit of 250 participants.  

The sprint distance for adults is a 500-yard pool swim (10 laps/20 lengths), followed by a 20K (12.4 miles) bike and a 5K (3.1 miles) run.  The kids have a choice of a long course or a short course. The long course includes a 100-yard (two lap) swim, a 2-mile bike, and .8 mile run. The short course includes a 50-yard (one lap) swim, a 2-mile bike, and .8 mile run.

Race director Kristin Folmar says 150-225 kids typically turn out for the Eagle River Tri, which she calls a low-key, no-pressure event. 

“If a kid swims one lap in the pool and wants to get out, that’s an option,” she said. “It is meant to be a fun, safe, positive experience and an event for the whole family. It is a community event, and the kids get to see the adults participate first. The kids get to warm up with pre-game events sponsored by Healthy Futures and Chain Reaction Cycles.”

For more information about the Eagle River Tri, visit the kid’s page on the website. Families who are interested in signing up for other summer events can learn more online.  Information about the Mayor’s Marathon Kid’s Mile on June 21 can be found here. Learn more about the Anchorage RunFest Kids 2K on August 18 at this website. Plan ahead for these fun events! 

Photograph courtesy of Matias Saari, Healthy Futures program


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May 11
Alaskans Take A Trail Back to Health
	 Campbell Creek Trail Map from the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) and Anchorage Park Foundation’s “Health on Trails” program

In winter or summer, the trails across Alaska are ideal for great adventures. Some Alaskans use them in a big way, such as mushing dogs almost 1,000 miles along trails during the yearly Iditarod race. Alaska’s health department is partnering with the Anchorage Park Foundation to help many Alaskans use them in an everyday way. Anchorage Park Foundation’s “Health on Trails” program makes it easier for people to learn what trails are nearby, how long it takes to walk them, and how far you can go on trails during a lunch break or after work.

“The Anchorage Park Foundation works hard to improve our parks and trails. However, if people aren’t getting out and enjoying these premier amenities, then we aren’t making the most of our resources,” said Molly Lanphier, with the foundation. “Getting out during the workday is one way that Anchorage residents can take full advantage of Anchorage’s crown jewel.”

Alaska’s Obesity Prevention and Control Program worked with the foundation to pilot a worksite wellness map project as part of the Health on Trails initiative. Together they are working with two employers — the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) and Catholic Social Services — to connect employees to the parks and trails closest to their worksite and promote workplace wellness.

“The wellness map gives employees the tools, social support, and encouragement to adopt a physically active lifestyle right from their office door” said Karol Fink, program manager for the state’s obesity prevention program.

The custom-designed map shows a safe and interesting walking route that employees can take right from their office door — before, after or during their breaks at work. The maps include the nearby trail’s distance, safety considerations, and a legend that highlights viewpoints, bridges, and other attractions along the path. To learn about the map and walking route, employees were invited to attend a luncheon and take a guided tour of the route with Lanphier from the Park Foundation.

As one example, Catholic Social Services’ map showcases baseball fields, sitting benches, and a warning where sidewalks are not present during the 1.25-mile walk around Tikishla Park. On the back of the map, there are recommendations for changing weather conditions, respecting wildlife, and how to be prepared to enjoy the outdoors.

Encouraging Alaskans to walk on trails before or after work or during breaks is one way to help people of all ages get closer to the nationally recommended amount of daily activity. Many Alaskans are currently falling short. In 2015, 58% of Alaska adults met the recommended 150 minutes of aerobic physical activity per week. In 2017, only 18% of Alaska high school students met the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day of the week. The maps are one way APIA and Catholic Social Services are supporting their employees in making healthy lifestyle choices and promoting physical activity.

“Alaska is unique because the weather and daylight is always changing. Finding opportunities that are safe, enjoyable, and easily accessible is important,” said Inmaly Inthaly from Catholic Social Services. “Walking from our worksite makes a lot of sense because we’re already here.”

Go online to learn more about the Health on Trails program.

April 17
East High Thunderbird soars to big leagues in baseball

Chad Nading.pngAlaska is a state where high school standouts go on to ski for a gold medal at the Olympics, shoot hoops for the NBA, and play baseball for the big leagues.

That’s Chad Nading’s story – from East High Thunderbird to baseball player for the San Diego Padres system. For Nading, it started with a physically active childhood and continued through years of sticking with the game.

“In 2016, I was sitting on a couch with no opportunities to keep playing, when an independent baseball team — the Wichita Wingnuts — called me,” said Nading, the former four-time Alaska state champion. “They needed help filling innings because they had injuries.”
 
“I had no guarantee I would stay for more than a weekend. It was my decision whether to take a chance and play, or retire from baseball.”
 
Nading took a chance. He earned a permanent spot with the Wingnuts and later signed with the San Diego Padres organization in 2017. He went on to play with the San Antonio Missions.
 
“I took a chance and got the opportunity to prove myself, and it was the best decision I could have made,” he said.
 
Over the years, Nading kept sharpening his skills by coaching with the Alaska Baseball Academy and Notre Dame Preparatory, while giving young athletes the knowledge he wished he had at a younger age. Nading points to his youth as the reason for his success.
 
“I was very active as a kid. Whatever my friends wanted to do – roller hockey, fishing, basketball, football – I was willing to do it,” he said. “My parents were very supportive of my desire to be active, as well as whatever I decided to do.”
 
His experience with sports turned into a passion, which turned into a determination to excel. Nading lettered in multiple sports at Anchorage School District’s East High School, winning state titles in track and field, baseball, and football.
 
“Sports are humbling, especially in the big leagues,” he said. “Staying positive in tough times and confident in good times has led me to where I am. I had to fight through really bad days by telling myself that I was good enough and tomorrow is a new day to show my ability.”
 
Nading encourages youth to be as active as possible and try several sports.
 
“Be coachable, while listening to yourself,” he said. “Take care of yourself by eating well, exercising often.”
 
He had one more reminder: Drink plenty of water. Nading said he remembers to drink water by carrying a bottle with him and filling it up at least four times each day.
 
Photograph courtesy of Chad Nading
April 04
Winning a spring race in Alaska means naming animals, getting other unique prizes

BB5k 2007 067.jpgHave you ever competed in a race when winning meant crossing the finish line before the last note of a song? What about when winning gave you naming rights for a bison? Communities across Alaska are organizing a set of unique races to kick off this spring’s running season.

These events are supported by our partner, Healthy Futures. Thousands of children across Alaska are logging their physical activity this month on their Healthy Futures Challenge logs. These fun events count toward the children’s goal of 60 minutes of physical activity every day.

Beat Beethoven in Fairbanks

It’s time to sign up for “Beat Beethoven,” an annual 5K race that kicks off the running season in Fairbanks on Saturday, April 14, 2018. Participants who finish before the last note of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony get a voucher for free admission to a Fairbanks Symphony Orchestra performance. The composer’s well-known symphony is about 31 minutes long, which could make it a quick-paced race on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. 

Early bird registration for this Symphony Orchestra fundraiser ends Monday, April 9, and late registration continues through race day. The race starts at 11 a.m. April 14. Healthy Futures will hand out medals to children who finish.

Run in Portage to name first-born bison

Further south, Portage will be the site for another interesting fun run on April 14, 2018. The Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center has organized the Bison Run Wild 5K to raise funds to care for the wood bison at the center. The man and woman who win the race will get to name the first bison born this season. Go online for more information and to register for the race that starts at 11 a.m. 

Race for a healthy heart in Anchorage

April brings the 40th annual Alaska Heart Run in Anchorage. A timed race begins at 9:30 a.m. and an untimed race starts at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 21, 2018. Participants can walk or run a 3K or 5K course at the Alaska Airlines Center on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus. The event benefits the American Heart Association to pay for research and programs that help address heart disease and stroke. Top finishers in each age group will receive certificates and ribbons. All children in grades 6 and under will receive medals. Go online for more information or to register.

Visit an Alaska events website to find out more about summer events supported by Healthy Futures.

​Photograph courtesy of the Fairbanks Symphony Orchestra

March 12
Vitamin D is important for strong bones, good health

Vitamin D.jpgVitamin D is often called the “sunshine vitamin” because our bodies can make vitamin D when sunlight contacts the skin. During our dark winter months, many Alaskans are getting very little (if any) vitamin D from sunlight exposure, so we need to think about getting the vitamin through foods and supplements. Vitamin D is important for strong bones and may contribute to overall good health.

“Eating healthy foods is always the best option”, says Diane Peck, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with the Alaska Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. “Healthy foods provide so many more nutrients and other benefits that aren’t found in supplements. But for many people in Alaska, taking a vitamin D supplement along with a healthy diet may be appropriate.”

Lucky for us, some of the foods with the most vitamin D are found in Alaska. Traditional diets protected Alaska Native people during the long, dark winter. Salmon — fresh, canned or smoked — is an excellent source of vitamin D. Marine mammals, fish oil and seal oil contain large amounts of vitamin D. Oysters, shrimp, halibut, flounder, and rock fish are good sources, too. 

Other foods that contain vitamin D include tuna fish, cod liver oil, egg yolks, and some mushrooms. Vitamin D has also been added to many foods. Look for the words “vitamin D fortified” on packages of milk, soymilk, yogurt, orange juice, oatmeal, and ready-to-eat cereals. For a list of foods and their vitamin D content, see the U.S. Dietary Guidelines.
 
The amount of vitamin D needed varies throughout your lifespan. You can learn more about the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-Consumer/. Besides living in a place without much sunlight, other factors may affect vitamin D levels:
 
• People with darker skin don’t produce vitamin D as quickly as people with lighter skin.
• Older adults may not produce vitamin D as well as younger people.
• Breastfeeding is the best choice for the health of infants, but breast milk can be low in vitamin D.
 
If you think you’re not getting enough vitamin D, talk with your health care provider. It is important to note that taking too much vitamin D can have negative effects and may interact with other medications you’re taking.
 
For more information about vitamin D, see this Alaska Section of Epidemiology website and this State of Alaska educational resource.
 
February 27
Healthy Futures marks 15 years of providing physical activity challenges, events to Alaska children

Spring 2018 HFC map.png​Fifteen years ago, a small nonprofit started a free physical activity challenge to help Alaska children get moving. The hope was to support children to be physically active every day. This would help them grow up healthy and prevent childhood obesity, a serious problem in our state. 

Healthy Futures — a small program with a big goal — has been supporting active children all across Alaska ever since. During the first Healthy Futures Challenge in 2003, just 30 of Alaska’s 400 elementary schools participated. The Healthy Futures program was founded by the late Bonny Sosa Young and her husband Sam Young, parents who were concerned about childhood obesity in Alaska.

Since 2003, more partners started to work with Healthy Futures to support physical activity. Providence Health & Services Alaska is a longtime partner. The United Way of Anchorage supports the program, as does the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, ConocoPhillips, the Alaska Kidney Foundation and others. The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Obesity Prevention and Control Program and its Play Every Day campaign became a partner for the 2012 Spring Challenge, and that partnership continues today. Now, Healthy Futures is run through another organization called the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame.

Participation took off as more organizations started working with Healthy Futures to promote the same goal of active Alaska kids. Look at how the program has grown:

  • First Challenge during the 2003-2004 school year: 30 schools, 2,300 participating children
  • Spring 2012 Challenge: 110 schools, almost 7,000 participating children
  • Fall 2017 Challenge: 165 schools, more than 14,000 participating children
  • Spring 2018 Challenge: About 175 schools signed up for the Challenge that runs February through April, 2018

“It's nice to see the growth of the Healthy Futures program over the years, but it's especially gratifying to know that the essence of Healthy Futures has never really wavered during that time,” said Harlow Robinson, executive director of Healthy Futures and the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame. “The mission and the core programs have always been fundamentally sound and that is a testament to Bonny Sosa's vision.”

It’s not too late for schools to sign up for the Spring Challenge online. The Spring Challenge runs in February, March and April. Students keep a log of their daily physical activity with the goal of being active at least 60 minutes a day for 15 days each month. This helps Alaska children get closer to the national recommendation of 60 minutes of physical activity every day for the best health. The challenge is free to schools and students. Students who successfully log their physical activity each month of the challenge win a prize from Healthy Futures.

Staff at interested schools can contact alyse@healthyfuturesak.org to learn about signing up for this and future physical activity challenges. Parents can ask their children if their elementary schools are participating in the challenge (almost half of them are), and can help support their kids to complete the physical activity goals each month.

The map of schools participating in the Spring Healthy Futures Challenge was created in mid February, 2018.

February 20
State health leaders train YKHC, Arctic Slope Native Association dental staff to help reduce sugary drink consumption across Alaska

Dr. Tucker and IsaiahState health leaders focused on obesity prevention are working with Alaska dental providers to help reduce sugary drink consumption among children and families.

During January and February, Alaska Obesity Prevention and Control Program staff visited Bethel and Utqiagvik to train more than 80 dentists, dental assistants, and dental health aide therapists, as well as pharmacists, pediatricians, physician assistants and diabetes prevention professionals. The providers with the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation and Arctic Slope Native Association learned how to use a new, brief guide called “When Sugar is Not So Sweet.”

The trained dental providers are now using the guide to talk with families about the large amount of sugar hiding in many drinks, the health risks linked to that added sugar, and steps families can take to cut back on sugary drinks and choose water or milk instead. The brief guide is available for free online. A rack card about picking a plan to cut back on sugary drinks also is available online.

“This training gave our entire team knowledge and tools that we need to influence an efficient change in our community,” said Dr. Tucker Burnett, a dentist with YKHC. “With this training, we are better equipped to reach out and help adjust our patients’ thinking about what they drink.”

The new guide for dental providers offers another strategy to talk with families about the risks of eating and drinking too much sugar. Sugary drinks are the number one source of added sugar in people’s daily diets.

“Too many of Alaska’s children and adults are drinking sugary beverages, often every single day,” said Karol Fink, the Obesity Prevention and Control Program manager who conducted the trainings. “About 40 percent of Alaska high school students report drinking at least one sugary drink every day. Almost 25 percent of Alaska adults say they drink a sugary drink every day.”

Just one sugary drink can have more added sugar than children and adults should have in one day, based on the added sugar limits in the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Helping Alaskans cut back on added sugar can help prevent serious health problems that may start in childhood and last a lifetime, Fink said. These health problems include cavities, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity. In Alaska, about 1 out of 3 children is overweight or obese. About 2 out of 3 adults are overweight or obese.

The training offered for YKHC and Arctic Slope dental staff is part of a two-year pilot Healthy Drinks for Healthy Kids project. The project is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to improve dental health and prevent obesity and other chronic diseases in Alaska. The pilot is supported by the Alaska Dental Society; the Alaska Women’s, Children’s and Family Health, Oral Health program; and dental providers across the state.

The Healthy Drinks for Healthy Kids project also includes new public education materials focused on reducing sugary drink consumption. Two public service announcements will air on television and online this spring. One video announcement shows how cutting back on sugary drinks can help prevent serious health problems, including tooth decay and type 2 diabetes. The other video shows parents switching out unhealthy food items for healthier options at meals, but stresses that parents would be doing more to protect their children’s health if they also stopped serving them sugary drinks and served water or milk instead. Parents and their children also will see educational posters hanging in hundreds of schools across Alaska, as well as in public health centers, medical and dental clinics, and in Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) offices. Alaskans will find related videos and educational posts on social media.

Visit our website to learn more about the Healthy Drinks for Healthy Kids project. Dental providers who want to know more about the guide can contact playeveryday@alaska.gov.

Photograph: Dr. Tucker Burnett and dental assistant Isaiah Anvil with the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation received training to use the brief dental guide called "When Sugar Is Not So Sweet."

 
January 30
There's still time to sign up your school to help Alaska kids get moving during PLAAY Day

PLAAY logo.jpgKids at Auntie Mary Nicoli Elementary in Aniak are getting ready to play. So are kids at elementary schools in Craig, Glennallen, Ketchikan, Kiana, Manokotak, Nightmute and White Mountain.

Around the state, about 80 elementary schools and groups have signed up to help children complete a half hour of organized physical activity — all at the same time in communities across the state. They will be participating in the second PLAAY Day, scheduled for Thursday morning, Feb. 22, 2018. PLAAY stands for Positive Leadership for Active Alaska Youth. Our partner, the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame, is running PLAAY Day to help Alaska children get active for good health.

It’s not too late for schools to sign up to participate. PLAAY organizers are hoping for at least 150 participating schools, so thousands of children across the state have the opportunity to be physically active on PLAAY Day.

“The goal behind PLAAY Day is to galvanize communities to encourage children to be physically active,” said Harlow Robinson, executive director of the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame. “A shared physical activity — especially on the grand scale of our state — has the potential to create enthusiasm around the cause.”

At 10 a.m. that morning, children will participate in a half hour of physical activity in school gyms, classrooms, recreation centers, common spaces or even outside. Students from the University of Alaska Anchorage Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation along with Anchorage-based youth will lead the children in an organized and synchronized fun session of activity. Children will be able to participate at their appropriate levels and physical abilities. Physical activities included during PLAAY Day will be able to be modified and adapted to include students of all abilities, Robinson said.

The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and GCI will link all of these schools and groups through a free, live videoconferencing session. Schools and organizations can participate in different ways, from toll free dialing into a conference with video playing at their location to interactive video teleconference participation.

Schools can sign up now for PLAAY DAY and will receive more information about the event as the date gets closer. Interested schools and groups can register as an entire school, a classroom, a home school, or an organization.

Along with organizing PLAAY Day, the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame will run the PLAAY Summit on Feb. 23 and 24, 2018, in Anchorage at ANTHC. The Summit will feature experts from around the state who will help teachers, parents, nurses, coaches, administrators and other leaders address many areas of youth and adolescent health, including psychological, social and emotional development. The PLAAY Summit also will focus on physical activity as a way to improve health.

Partners of the PLAAY Day and PLAAY Summit include Healthy Futures, ANTHC, GCI, the Alaska Center for Pediatrics, Alaska Airlines, Children’s Hospital at Providence, the Anchorage School District, Bristol Bay Native Corporation, Play Every Day, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, Vidyo, The Alaska Club, Anchorage Running Club, LaTouche Pediatrics, Alaska Pediatric Therapy, Bear Tooth, Kaladi Brothers, and others.

To learn more about PLAAY Day or the PLAAY Summit, contact Wallace Wilson at wally@alaskasportshall.org or Harlow Robinson at harlow@alaskasportshall.org.

January 15
Fairbanks students invent a bracelet to remind you to drink water

Dawson and Zach hydracelet.JPG

A group of 10 elementary and middle school boys in Fairbanks have invented a device to get you thinking about how much water you drink every day.

They did their research this year and learned that kids — and adults — don’t always drink enough water every day for the best health. They want to help you remember to drink water every day, and they designed an original bracelet to help you do that. They named it the Hydracelet.

These boys have a special name, too. They’re called the Philosophers, which is the team name for their Lego Robotics competition. They work together through the Interior Distance Education of Alaska (IDEA) homeschool program in Fairbanks. Lego Robotics involves building and programming robots to accomplish tasks. Each year, the First Lego League competition also comes with a research topic. This year’s topic is hydrodynamics. Each group had to come up with a water-related challenge and design a plan to tackle it. The Philosophers chose to explore ways to help people who don’t drink enough water every day. 

 “I was one of those kids who didn’t drink enough water, until I used the Hydracelet,” said 12-year-old Dawson Cooper, a seventh-grader on the Philosophers team.

It turns out the Hydracelet was a winning idea. The Philosophers won the Best Project award during the Fairbanks Lego Robotics regional qualifier in December, so the team and their Hydracelets will be in Anchorage this Saturday, January 20, 2018, for the statewide Lego Robotics competition at Dimond High School.

“We’re going to give them to the judges so they can see how they work,” Dawson said.

When designing the Hydracelet, Dawson talked with Fairbanks pediatrician Dr. Letha Archer to learn more about water and good health. Dr. Archer said not drinking enough water is definitely a problem she has seen in her 22 years of practice. Dehydration can lead to constipation and headaches, she said. Water also helps your body maintain a normal temperature, cushion the joints, and get rid of waste through sweating and urination, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“I see a lot of kids who drink the wrong kinds of drinks, so I push water,” Dr. Archer said. The wrong kinds of drinks, she said, are those with added sugar, like soda, sports drinks, and sweetened fruit drinks. These drinks can hurt teeth, and lead to weight gain and obesity, she said. Water, on the other hand, has no added sugar and no calories.

Dr. Archer said she thinks the Philosophers are working on a great research project and she was impressed by the Hydracelet. The team worked with an online company to order blue silicone bracelets in adult and youth sizes that say “Hydracelet” on the inside and have the numbers 1 through 8 printed in a large white font on the outside. Each number stands for one, 8-ounce glass of water. Then the group worked with a 3D printer in the Fairbanks area to create a square-shaped slider that wraps around the bracelet. Each time you drink an 8-ounce glass of water, you move the slider up a number. When the slider reaches 8, you know you have consumed eight glasses of water, or 64 ounces, that day.

How much water you need every day depends on a number of factors: your age, weight, overall health, physical activity level, and more. The Mayo Clinic says 8, 8-ounce glasses of water a day is “easy to remember, and it’s a reasonable goal.” Some people might eed more, and some might need less. Dr. Archer said 64 ounces of water a day is a good target in general for older school-age children and adults.

Zach Burgess, a 12-year-old Philosophers team member who lives in North Pole, said he didn’t drink that much water each day before wearing the Hydracelet. He said he drank only two to three glasses of water a day, and thinks this led to a lot of headaches. He’s been wearing a Hydracelet for the past two months and said he moves the slider over to eight glasses of water most days.

“Every time I look at my wrist and it’s a low number, it reminds me to drink more water,” Zach said.
 
The boys started with a limited quantity of Hydracelets, only about 200. They raised funds to pay for this first batch and sell them for a few dollars each, putting the proceeds toward buying more. Dawson said they are hoping to raise enough money to buy Hydracelets that they can give away to hospitals, clinics and schools in the Fairbanks area. Dawson said he hopes handing out Hydracelets will help teach kids the importance of drinking water for good health. Zach said he hopes children around Alaska — and maybe around the country — will wear them.
 
You can learn more about the Philosophers and their Hydracelet project on Facebook. The team also has an Etsy page for the bracelet.
 
Photograph: Dawson Cooper, left, and Zach Burgess, right, wear their Hydracelets to help remind them to drink water. 
 
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