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November 18
Play Every Day student video contest winners come from Salcha, Palmer and Anchorage


Looking for fun ways to play and motivation for getting physically active? Check out the 11 entries to the 2014 Play Every Day student video contest. This fall, kids from seven elementary schools in four school districts submitted short videos telling the story of play through images of kids jumping, sledding, climbing, skiing, running, and throwing balls.

 SalchaPSA 2014-11-14 Blizzard250x250.jpg

Salcha Elementary School won first place with a video showing kids sledding, skiing and going down slides while singing, “Twinkle, twinkle play outside, outside in the northern lights.” The short clip includes a comical twist about the weather and supports the message of physical activity. “How do you play?” the children ask. “It doesn’t matter what you do, just get outside and play every day.”

 

Ronda Schlumbohm, the sponsoring teacher of the winning team, said, “I love to let my students have the opportunity to say what they think and to get out a message. We do believe in getting outside and playing every day, because lots of brain research has been done in this area that proves that getting out is beneficial for children.”

 

Her 2nd/3rd grade class at Salcha, one of the smallest schools in the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District, won by coupling playfulness with zeal.

 

The creative process began when Mariko Kinikin, a district technology teacher, shared the technical requirements with students and helped them look for and define the elements of a good public service announcement (PSA), explained Schlumbohm. Kinikin talked to the class about the different ways to approach a PSA, such as humor, song and a straightforward message.

 

“The funny thing is that when we put it together, we did all three,” said Schlumbohm.

 

Kinikin also helped a 5th and 6th grade class at Salcha research and edit another video that tied for third place. Students started by looking at PSAs and then developed scripts, learned how to shoot film with iPads, and filmed and assessed four pilot PSAs, said Matt Anderson, the sponsoring teacher. After collectively choosing the strongest PSA, they re-shot it with a better camera.

 

“It was great to watch my students find workable solutions to some of the same problems that I had when I was first starting out,” said Anderson. “This process illustrates what can happen when children are given tools and expectations and then, with proper scaffolding, allowed to solve their own problems. This project was a first step.  I have no doubt that we will be doing more with video as the year progresses and I am really looking forward to it.”

 

Academy Charter School from the Mat-Su Borough School District won second place and Polaris K-12 from the Anchorage School District tied with Salcha for third place.

 

All 26 fifth-graders from the Academy class made their own videos from the same raw footage, said Julie Real, one of the sponsoring teachers. In doing so, they touched on technology, writing and public speaking. The class then decided on the four best videos and submitted them.

 

At Polaris, Corey Aist’s class of 4th and 5th graders practiced how to work together to accomplish a specific task, while he and a volunteer parent assisted. “They were excited,” he said. “They brainstormed, created a plan and story map, and wrote the script. Later, we helped edit it down to the 25 second limit.”

 

All PSA contest entries were due Oct. 31 and were free to submit. Students were instructed to show how children get out and play or complete the Healthy Futures Challenge, a physical activity program in more than 170 elementary schools across the state.

 

The contest received videos from Polaris and Lake Otis Elementary from the Anchorage School District, Academy and Trapper Creek from the Mat-Su Borough School District, Salcha and Chinook Charter from the Fairbanks North Star Borough, and Fort Yukon from the Yukon Flats School District.

 

Staff from Play Every Day and Healthy Futures voted on the winning entries by looking at creativity, technical quality, school and community activities represented, following the contest rules, and overall presentation.

 

Salcha will receive a $500 gift card to purchase physical activity equipment for all students, plus $25 gift cards for up to 10 students who created the video to purchase physical activity equipment. Everyone involved in making the videos will get Play Every Day T-shirts. In addition, Play Every Day plans to share the winning video through social media and TV.

 

The Play Every Day campaign has posted all of the submitted school videos on its YouTube channel, and will be sharing a number of them through its Facebook page.

November 05
How much sugar is in your drink?

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Just how much sugar can be hiding in a 20-ounce bottle of soda?
 
You can show the answer in teaspoons of sugar –16 or more – or by using an easily recognizable food comparison: One 20-ounce bottle of soda could contain as much sugar as 16 chocolate mini doughnuts.
 
With that in mind, Play Every Day launched its new public education campaign on sugary drinks this month with a TV public service announcement, printed posters for schools and health clinics, a new website and a school lesson plan that uses the doughnut and soda comparison to shine a spotlight on the large amount of sugar hidden in many types of sugary drinks.
 
The point is to bring attention to the amount of added sugar Alaska families drink when they serve soda or fruit-flavored, powdered, sports, energy and even vitamin-enhanced drinks during meals and snacks. According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, added sugars contribute about 16 percent of the total calories in American diets, and almost half of that comes from sugary drinks.
 
The campaign goes beyond raising awareness and inspires families to reduce the amount of sugar sweetened beverages served to children. Sugary drinks contribute to a number of serious health problems, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and tooth decay. In Alaska, one out of three children is overweight or obese; and two out of three adults are overweight or obese. 
 
For the first three years of the Play Every Day campaign, the primary focus has been on the importance of daily physical activity for the best health and maintaining a healthy weight. Campaign messages have promoted at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day for children and participation in the Healthy Futures Challenge – a free school-based physical activity challenge that’s now in about 160 elementary schools across Alaska.
 
The campaign will continue to focus on the health benefits of physical activity while also working toward reducing the consumption of sugary drinks and promoting water and fat-free or low-fat milk as the healthiest drink options for Alaska children and their families.
 
Staff from the Play Every Day campaign and state Obesity Prevention and Control Program will visit Spring Hill Elementary in Anchorage on November 6 and Two Rivers Elementary near Fairbanks on November 10 to share the new sugary drinks lesson plan with health and physical education classes.
October 22
Seward school makes PE a daily priority

If you’re a third grader at Seward Elementary, you will have physical education class on Monday.
You’ll have it on Tuesday, too. And again Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
In fact, by the enMark Fraad Seward250x250.jpgd of the week, all students in grades 3 to 5 at Seward’s only elementary school will have 30 minutes of PE, five days a week, meeting the recommended 150 weekly minutes of PE for elementary-age children. When you add in the morning and lunch recess time, Seward’s children are getting the recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity for good health – all before they leave school at the end of the day.
That makes Seward a standout school for the amount of PE and activity children get every day. Seward Elementary has only one PE teacher for the whole school – Mark Fraad. So how does one teacher provide PE instruction to hundreds of kids every day of the week? Fraad explained how the whole school worked together during the 2005-06 school year to make PE a priority.
Back then, Seward Elementary offered only two or three PE classes a week, each 30 minutes long, for students in all grades. That is still the case for grades K-2, but the staff wanted to offer daily PE to grades 3-5.
Fraad said the teachers and Principal David Kingsland – who remains the principal today –looked at research showing that children do better academically when they are active in structured (PE classes) and unstructured (recess) ways and that their behavior improves, too.
The school’s staff knew they wanted to give the older children more PE time each week, so they asked themselves what they could change to make that happen.
Fraad said they agreed to compromises. School staff moved lunch into the classrooms to free up the gym for one or two more PE periods each day. Fraad took on more PE classes daily, too, and now teaches 10 to 11 thirty-minute PE periods a day.
“Our gym is always full,” he said. “We always have kids moving.”
Other teachers got involved, too, taking kids out for extra recess when possible. When Fraad has funds to buy additional physical activity equipment, he looks for what he calls “Take 10” equipment – anything you can use when you have just 10 minutes to be active in class. Every bit of activity counts. Fraad and other Seward Elementary teachers also offer five after-school intramural activities each year – cross country running, soccer, basketball, volleyball and cross country skiing. When classrooms achieve a goal, they ask for an extra PE class instead of treats.
“We’re offering a healthy alternative to the pizza party,” Fraad said.
Fraad said school staff noticed improved student performance immediately after adding more PE time.
During the school year following the addition of PE classes, the percent of students proficient in math skills increased in grades 3-6 (Seward Elementary taught preschool through sixth grade until last year, when sixth grade moved to the middle school). The percent of students proficient in reading skills also increased in grades 3 and 5.
“We believe incorporating PE every day was a contributing factor in bringing our school’s percent proficient up and keeping it at that high level in the subsequent years,” said David Kingsland, who has been principal at Seward Elementary for the past 15 years.
Fraad said not all schools will be able to make the same changes Seward Elementary did to add more PE and activity to their students’ days. Every school has challenges to overcome to add physical activity, but he said there may be compromises that would add more recess or PE time. It’s paid off for Seward’s kids, Fraad said, helping them stay in shape physically and scholastically.
“Physical activity improves academics,” he said. “It improves kids’ behavior.”

Photo features PE teacher Mark Fraad of Seward Elementary juggling with work and play.
October 13
Grab a camera! There's still time to enter the video contest

15-OPCP-0907-School PSA Poster-250x.jpgAlaska kids, you still have time to create and film a short video about how you get out and play.
The Play Every Day campaign’s video PSA contest ends Friday, October 31. The contest is challenging elementary school students across Alaska to create a 25-second video about how they get physically active every day, complete the Healthy Futures Challenge, or a combination of both. The Healthy Futures Challenge continues in 190 Alaska schools this month. So far, more than 12,000 children across the state have completed Challenge logs showing they’ve been physically active each week this fall.
Film that fun activity and show off how you play.
Here’s how the contest works:
Who: All Alaska public elementary school students in grades K-6. All entries must be supported and sponsored by a teacher or another adult school staff member. Students should take the lead in the creative direction and production, but an adult can advise students and help with the filming.
What: Make a 25-second public service announcement (PSA) video that motivates Alaska kids and families to get physically active and stay healthy.
When: Start now! Come up with your ideas, film the video and turn it in by 5 p.m. October 31, 2014.
Where: Film the creative ways you are physically active at your school or in your communities.
Why: Because playing is fun, and so is filming videos with your friends.
A panel of judges from the Play Every Day campaign and Healthy Futures will select the top three videos based on overall presentation, creativity, quality and following the contest criteria. The school that films the first-place video will receive a $500 gift card to buy physical activity equipment for the school, plus $25 gift cards for up to 10 students who worked closely on the video. Prizes include Play Every Day T-shirts for participating students, teachers and the principal.
Want more information about the contest? Please visit our webpage to learn more.
October 07
Petersburg schools embrace Walk to School Day

Stormy weather can make walking to work or school a challenge, but with the right gear and knowledge, kids can turn the trip to school into a lifetime habit of good health. International Walk to School Day serves as a reminder that daily life offers plenty of opportunity for physical activity. FiveKidsWalkingSchool250x250.jpg
All three schools in Petersburg registered for the event this year. “It’s important for people to see they can walk and make it part of what they do every day,” said Ginger Evens, the Healthy Living Grant Coordinator for the Petersburg City School District, one of eight districts receiving state grants to help reduce childhood obesity by improving school nutrition and physical activity at school. “If you have to get a ride to school because you live 10 miles out, then leave the car at the boat harbor and walk the last half mile. We want to encourage that walking is okay. We want the high school kids to know that walking downtown at lunch is a good thing.”
This year, Walk to School Day takes place on Wednesday, October 8. What began as a one-day event in 1997 grew into an international walking day in communities throughout the United States and Canada. The goal centers on creating safe routes and walkable communities, and encouraging people to explore their routes by foot.
Evens would love to see high participation at Stedman Elementary, Mitkof Middle School, and Petersburg High School, but she knows the younger kids will hit the pavement in higher numbers. “I’d be happy if a few kids in high school say they walked,” she said.
All three schools have put notices out in school bulletins and informed students about the event. Primary teachers have talked to their students about the importance of using crosswalks and sidewalks, walking the right direction and making sure they can be seen. The day of the event, Evens will conduct a survey to figure out how Petersburg kids do get to school so she can look at ways to make walking appealing.
In the end, walking to school or work means choosing self-locomotion as transportation and getting healthier because of it.
September 30
Fun runs and daily play change with the seasons

KidsFunRunningHFShot 9.30.14.jpg
Fun runs and daily play change in beautiful ways come fall and winter. The leaves turn color and coat the ground. The air crisps up and ignites the last smells of summer. The sound of footsteps begins to soften.

 
Welcome to some of the best running of the year. The Bonny Sosa Tuesday Night Race Series continues in Anchorage through October, along with an array of walking and running events that keep the chilling, darkening season warmed up throughout Alaska.
 
Get the skinny on fall and winter events through Play Every Day, Healthy Futures, and the Municipality of Anchorage Runners Calendar.
 
Here’s a quick rundown of a few family-friendly events throughout Alaska this October:
 
Oct. 4
 
  • Hit the Trails: 5k and 2k options, 10 a.m. at Trailside Elementary in Anchorage
  • The Home Run: 5k and 10k loop courses, 8:15 a.m. and 8:45 a.m., 3190 Alumni Drive in Anchorage, www.AEclubUAA.com
  • It Ain’t Easy Hill Run: 5 miles flat, 11.3 miles hilly, 10 a.m. at Dog Mushers Hall, Farmers Loop in Fairbanks, www.runningclubnorth.org
 
Oct. 5
 
  • Readers on the Run: 5k walk/run, 11 a.m. John Trigg Ester Library Gazebo in Fairbanks
 
Oct 11
 
  • Run the Rock: 10k at 10 a.m., 13.1 mile at 10 a.m., 5k at 12:30 p.m., starting at the Bear Valley Golf Course in Kodiak, www.kmxt.org/run_the_rock/
 
Oct. 18
 
 
Oct. 25
 
  • Skinny Raven Frightening 4k: 11 a.m. at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage,
    www.skinnyraven.com
  • 33rd Halloween Family Run: 2 and 10 miles, 10 a.m. at the UAF Patty Center in Fairbanks, www.runningclubnorth.org
  • 2nd Annual Costume Run 5k: meet at 11 a.m. at the Nikiski Community Recreation Center, www.northpenrec.com
September 22
Tuesday Night Race Series inspires fun on the walk, jog, run

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Nearly 1,000 people will jog, run, walk and sprint over and through leaves, mud and puddles in each of eight races in the Bonny Sosa Tuesday Night Race Series this fall. The event run by Anchorage Parks and Recreation has engaged people of all ages in fun runs on city trails for decades.
The rainier and windier the night, the fewer the participants, but not by a lot — 854 people joined the first race this year compared to 1,100 who ran the second “less rainy and windy night,” said Margaret Timmerman of Parks and Recreation.
Needless to say, rain, wind and other dynamics like hilly courses and competitors in costume make for fun and unpredictable workouts. The race lengths vary for age, interest and skill, with courses ranging from a few kilometers for kids and kids at heart, 3 to 10 for recreational runners, and 4 to 12 for competitive racers. 
Timmerman reiterated the core principle of the program when giving tips for kids of all ages: “Stay on course, watch for trail markers and enjoy yourself,” she said. “It doesn’t matter where you place, just that you get out and run.”
The race series represents just one of the many ways Anchorage supports getting out and playing. Remember to check out the Anchorage Parks and Recreation Activity Guide for activities like swimming, basketball, dance, skiing and yoga. Many are free or low-cost and open to all skill levels and ages.
As for the Tuesday Races, well they continue through the costume run on Oct. 28 and the awards banquet on Nov. 4. Online registration closes at 6 p.m. on the day of the event, with race time at 6:30 p.m. On-site registration is available at some races, but check online to confirm.
Here’s the remaining 2014 race schedule:   
·        September 23 - Tozier Track
·        September 30 - East High
·        October 7 - Russian Jack Springs Park (Cartee Fields)
·        October 14 - Service High
·        October 21 - Service High
·        October 28 - Kincaid Park Costume Run
·        November 4 - Kincaid Outdoor Center

Photo courtesy Anchorage Parks and Recreation
September 09
Kids, cameras, ACTION! Play Every Day video contest puts kids behind the lens

Hey Alaska kids:

Do you have a fun way you like to play?
We challenge you to show us what that looks like. The Play Every Day campaign is holding a video PSA contest challenging elementary school students across Alaska to create a short video about how you get out and play. The deadline for entries is Friday, October 31. 15-OPCP-0907-School PSA Poster-3C-SJ[1].jpg
Last year, Gladys Wood Elementary School in Anchorage created a fun video about how students there get physically active and do the Healthy Futures Challenge, which kicks off again in 186 Alaska schools this week. We thought the idea was so creative we decided to start a statewide video contest.
Use your video to show how you get physically active every day, complete the Healthy Futures Challenge, or a combination of both.
Here’s how it works:
Who: All Alaska public elementary school students in grades K-6. All entries must be supported and sponsored by a teacher or another adult school staff member. Students should take the lead in the creative direction and production, but an adult can advise students and help with the filming.
What: Make a 25-second public service announcement (PSA) video that motivates Alaska kids and families to get physically active and stay healthy.
When: Start now! Come up with your ideas, film the video and turn it in by 5 p.m. October 31, 2014.
Where: Film the creative ways you are physically active at your school or in your communities.
Why: Because playing is fun, and so is filming videos with your friends.
A panel of judges from the Play Every Day campaign and Healthy Futures will select the top three videos based on overall presentation, creativity, quality and adherence to the contest criteria. The school that films the first-place video will receive a $500 gift card to buy physical activity equipment for the school, plus $25 gift cards for up to 10 students who worked closely on the video. Prizes include Play Every Day T-shirts for participating students, teachers and the principal.
Want more information about the contest? Please visit our webpage to learn more.
Now grab your friends and make a movie – kids, cameras, ACTION!

September 03
Jamborees give kids a chance to run away with a smile

Jamboree.healthy futures 224.jpg

Give a kid a race bib, and she’ll run. Give him a finish line, and he’ll lunge over it. Rain or shine, breezy or chilly, the Anchorage School District’s Elementary Cross-Country Jamborees give kids a chance to dash and run away with a sense of accomplishment.

“Much like the Tuesday Night Race series organized by the Muni, these Jamborees offer our children's families low-stakes and high-energy opportunities for healthy exercise and play,” said Ben Elbow, a co-organizer of the North Anchorage Jamboree and a physical education teacher at Rogers Park Elementary. “As a parent and teacher in Anchorage, I'm thankful for our city's tremendous trail system and appreciate all the dedicated volunteers who help organize these events.”
The annual citywide event began in 1987 when Baxter Elementary teacher Mike Allan threw the first Jamboree with help from Baxter Community Schools. He ran the Jamborees until 2003, when the elementary school physical education staff decided to split the race into three regional events in north Anchorage, south Anchorage, and Eagle River. By then, many schools had formed after-school running groups to help kids build endurance and confidence while playing games and running.
Now thousands of kids join the Jamborees across the city, and all receive ribbons after their photo finish.
"The Anchorage Elementary School Jamborees are one of the truly great Alaskan family traditions and they embody everything Healthy Futures stands for," said Harlow Robinson, the executive director of the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame and the Healthy Futures program. "We are proud to be a partner and to support the event any way we can."
Students can get a head start on the Jamborees by doing the Coyote Classic at Kincaid Elementary on Sept. 13 at 10 a.m. Get a rundown of events and fun runs for kids here and on the Healthy Futures calendar. Here are the dates and times of the upcoming Jamborees:
·        Beach Lake Trails (Eagle River) Jamboree – Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Chugiak High School soccer fields and trails starting at 5 p.m.
·        North Anchorage Jamboree – Wednesday, Sept. 24, at Bartlett High School starting at 5 p.m.
·        South Anchorage Jamboree – Saturday, Sept. 27, at Service High School starting at 9:30 a.m.
 
Photo courtesy of Healthy Futures. 
August 27
Skiku gets the jam on to keep kids active all year

BlueberryJamGirlinPinkSkikuShot2014.jpgThe first Blueberry Jam Fun Run in Kotzebue last year drew 65 people to the rolling, scenic course. Skiku coaches expected a few more this year and ended up picking barely enough berries for the 265 people who walked, jogged and ran across the finish line.

With ripe fruit and beautiful terrain as ingredients, the Blueberry Jam represents one of the many activities orchestrated by Skiku – sometimes known as NANANordic – to promote a healthy and active lifestyle for Alaska kids. What began as a Nordic ski program now integrates running, biking, and duathlon training with skate skiis and laser rifles.
“Being active all year is what we’re promoting,” said Robin Kornfield, the program manager for Skiku and vice president of communications and marketing for NANA Development. “Hunting, fishing and gathering are part of the lifestyle, and this fits into what people already do.”
Skiku runs a Nordic ski program in March and a running program in August. Competitive skiers come from throughout the country coach school kids in communities like Selawik, Kotzebue, Noatak and Shungnak. These volunteers teach physical fitness, Nordic skiing, the winter duathlon and all manner of play and, in turn, get to experience Alaska in a one-of-a-kind way.
The program also provides equipment to kids and schools to help sustain enthusiasm throughout the seasons. This year, Anchorage bicycle shops donated bikes so that kids can ride all year.
Through camps, gear and a good dose of play, the program helps “even people who aren’t into skiing or running stay active and involved,” said Kornfield.

 

Photo by Zach Hall, courtesy of Skiku.

 

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